PortugueseEnglish
Ê Ogum ê Ogum é tata que malembe, Ê Ogum ê Ogum é tata que malembe
Coro
Ê Ogum ê Ogum é tata que malembe, Ê Ogum ê Ogum é tata que malembe

Ê Ogum ê Ogum é tata que malembe, Ê Ogum ê Ogum é tata que malembe
Ê Ogum ê Ogum é tata que malembe Ê Ogum ê Ogum é tata que malembe

Ogum ê!
Tata que malembe
Ogum ê!
Tata que malembe
Ogum ê!
Tata que malembe
Ê Ogum ê Ogum é father that sooths, Ê Ogum ê Ogum é father that soothes
Coro
Ê Ogum ê Ogum é father that soothes Ê Ogum ê Ogum é father that soothes

Ê Ogum ê Ogum é tata que malembe Ê Ogum ê Ogum é tata que malembe
Ê Ogum ê Ogum é father that soothes Ê Ogum ê Ogum é father that soothes

Ogum ê!
Father that soothes
Ogum ê!
Father that soothes
Ogum ê!
Father that soothes

Explanation:

The song is primarily asking for protection and patronage from Ogum. Ogum is a deity associated with war and iron in the Afro-Brazilian religions like Candomblé and Umbanda. The repetition of phrases like "Tata who soothes" (where "Tata" means "Father") suggests a plea or request for protection and perhaps guidance in overcoming difficulties or conflicts. Asking for protection or blessings from an orixá, or a God of the Afro-Brazilian religions is common in many Capoeira songs. What makes this song unique is that the song makes reference to Ogum, the god of war, and the ask that Ogum brings peace to a rough game/situation.

"Tata" is the same as "Babá" in the Yoruba language, which means "Father". The word "malembê" or "malembe" in Afro-Brazilian contexts, particularly in songs and chants related to Candomblé and Umbanda, generally conveys meanings associated with gentleness, calmness, or soothing. It's often used as a plea or a request to ease tension, reduce aggression, or bring peace. Translating it as "soothes" in the context of a song or chant directed at a deity like Ogum reflects a desire for the deity to provide protection in a gentle, calming manner.