Portuguese

English
Introdução opcional:
Seu Capoeira Que Aconteceu
Naquela roda em noite de lua
Deu meia-lua, levou cabeçada
Meu camarada pode acreditar
Pois nessa roda foi uma beleza
Na certeza que eu vim de la
Daquela terra muito abençoada
É da Bahia que eu vou falar

Vou mandar lecô

Cajuê

Vou mandar loiá

Cajuê

Vou mandar leco cajuê
Vou mandar loiá
Vou mandar leco cajuê
Vou mandar loiá

Vou mandar leco cajuê
Vou mandar loiá
Vou mandar leco cajuê
Vou mandar loiá


Vou mandar lecô

Cajuê

Vou mandar loiá

Cajuê

Vou mandar lecô

Cajuê

Vou mandar loiá

Cajuê
Optional introduction:
Capoeira Master, what happened
In that roda on a moonlit night
He gave a meia-lua, received a headbutt
My friend, you can believe it
Because in that roda, it was beautiful
I'm certain because I came from there
From that very blessed land
It's Bahia that I'm going to talk about

Vou send lecô

Cashew

I'll send loiá

Cashew

I'll send leco cajuê
I'll send loiá
I'll send leco cajuê
I'll send loiá

I'll send leco cajuê
I'll send loiá
I'll send leco cajuê
I'll send loiá

Vou send lecô

Cashew

I'll send loiá

Cashew

I'll send lecô

Cashew

I'll send loiá

Cashew
Author: Unknown

Optional Introduction

Song Explanation:

The introduction opens by addressing "Seu Capoeira," a term of respect for a master or esteemed practitioner. The song recounts a roda on a moonlit night, aluding to a mystical or magical scene. In this roda, a practitioner performs a "meia-lua" (half-moon kick) but receives a "cabeçada" (headbutt) in return. This line highlights the amazing moments that often in the roda and make people go "oooh" and "aaaah". Lastly, the singer expresses their pride in being part of the roda and their connection to Bahia, which they describe as a “very blessed land”. This description underscores the deep heritage and spiritual connection practitioners feel to capoeira’s origins.

The refrains "Vou mandar lecô" and "Vou mandar loiá," literally means that I send "leco" and I send "loiá". It's not clear who these poeple are in the song, but they are sent to bring cashews. Why cachews?

Traditional Use: In Brazil, cashews are widely consumed and celebrated. Both the cashew nut and the cashew apple (the fruit to which the nut is attached) are used in various culinary traditions. Cashew apples are eaten fresh, juiced, or made into sweets and beverages.
Symbolism: Cashews can symbolize fertility, abundance, and prosperity due to their high yield and economic value. In some Afro-Brazilian traditions, fruits like cashews are also associated with offerings to deities in Candomblé and other syncretic religions.

Additionally, in Portuguese, "caju" refers to the cashew tree and its fruit, which includes both the nut (castanha de caju) and the cashew apple (cajuína). "Cajuê" is not a standard Portuguese word and appears to be a phonetic or poetic variation used in capoeira songs or regional dialects, particularly in Bahia, Brazil. So, while "caju" is the correct and widely recognized term for the cashew tree and its fruit in Portuguese, "cajuê" seems to be a localized or creative variation used in specific cultural expressions, like this song!