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Aé Miré Miré
Aé Miré Miré
É de Babá é de Olorum
Mas Aé Miré Miré
Ê de Babá Luanda ô

Aé Miré Miré
Aé Miré Miré


Ê de Babá é de Olorum
Mas Aé Miré Miré
Ê de Babá Luanda ô

Aé Miré Miré
Aé Miré Miré
Aé Miré Miré
Aé Miré Miré
It’s from Babá Olorum
Yet Aé Miré Miré
It’s from Babá It’s from Luanda ô

Aé Miré Miré
Aé Miré Miré

It’s from Babá it's from Olorum
yet Aé Miré Miré
It’s from Babá It’s from Luanda ô

Aé Miré Miré
Aé Miré Miré
Author: Mestre Ananias

Song Explanation:

The phrase "Aé Miré Miré" itself doesn't have a direct translation but is commonly used in Afro-Brazilian religions like Candomblé and Umbanda as a greeting or an expression of reverence. It can be seen as a way of acknowledging and invoking the presence of spiritual entities or ancestors.

The lyrics mention "Babá," which can refer to a spiritual guide or father figure in African religions, and "Olorum," a term used in Candomblé to describe the supreme deity. This suggests that we are greeting or expressing reverence to Olorum, who is a paternal (babá) figure in this case.

The mention of "Luanda" likely refers to the city in Angola, highlighting the African roots of Capoeira, which originated from the enslaved Africans brought to Brazil. "Luanda" also holds significance in Capoeira history as it was a major port in the slave trade.

Overall, "Aé Miré Miré" can be interpreted as a song that pays homage to African spirituality, acknowledges the historical roots of Capoeira, and expresses the cultural and spiritual dimensions of the martial art form.